A new study called Amazon Alive: A Decade of Discoveries 1999-2009 says that some 1,200 new species of Amazon wildlife have been discovered. The Amazon biome is the most diverse on the planet according to Francisco Ruiz of the World Wildlife Fund’s Living Amazon Initiative. For examples, a new species of boa, Eunectes beniensis was discovered in 2002 and a new species of parrot, the Pyrilia aurantiocephala, was discovered in 2004. Environmentalists have long voiced concern over the vanishing Amazon rainforest, but in truth, a new species is discovered on an average of one every three days just in the Amazon biome. About the only endangered species is the “No Ordinary Family” TV series on ABC.

NORTHERN AMAZON, PERU - JUNE 11: Aerial scene of the Northern Amazon on June 11, 2007 in Peru. The scenes show pristine forest as well as the impact of roads into the forest, roadside urbanisation and the effects of that. The images also show the oil town of Trompederos. Scenes there depict the industry of Petroplus, an Argentine oil company and the effect it has on the forest and the pipeline leading thorugh it. The Amazon is a pristine river and massive rainforest is under threat from infrastructure development in Peru. The Achuar Indian people of this Northern region recently won a legal battle with Argentinian Oil giant PlusPetrol to stop them dumping waste oil water, so called 'hot-water' into their water supply. The amount is estimated at around 500 000 barrels a day over a period of 30 years. This has played havoc with the eco-systems around the town of Trompeteros. The oil company has yet to make good on its promises for payment and transparency. The oil company provides the bulk of employment for the polluted town of Trompeteros and thus has the local Achuan population under pressure to not pay attention to the pollution levels. The Achuan people are faced with a choice between a centuries old sustainable lifestyle in harmony with the environment or a move towards increased devastation of their natural lands in the Amazon basin by the oil industry.   (Photo by Brent Stirton/Getty Images)

Among the new species discovered this past decade were 637 types of plants, 257 fish, 216 amphibians, 55 reptiles , 16 birds and 39 mammals. Many are variations of previously discovered species. For example, the Amazon river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, was first discovered in 1830. A version of the pink river dolphins in Bolivia have now been determined to be a separate species, Inia boliviensis.

As I wrote recently in an article, ‘New Species Yoda Bat Discovered’, scientists around the world are finding new species continuously. So much of our Earth has yet to be truly explored. The cycle of life is indeed an amazing one and is still an ongoing process.

The new study, Amazon Alive: A Decade of Discoveries 1999-2009 says that some 1,200 new species of Amazon wildlife have been discovered. The Amazon biome is the most diverse on the planet according to Francisco Ruiz of the World Wildlife Fund’s Living Amazon Initiative. For examples, a new species of boa, Eunectes beniensis was discovered in 2002 and a new species of parrot, the Pyrilia aurantiocephala, was discovered in 2004. Environmentalists have long voiced concern over the vanishing Amazon rainforest, but in truth, a new species is discovered on an average of one every three days just in the Amazon biome. About the only endangered species on the planet is the “No Ordinary Family” TV series on ABC and programs like it.

View Of The Brazilian Rainforest Along A River. Amazon River Basin, Brazil.  (Photo by Steve Winter/National Geographic/Getty Images)

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