According to Alaska Senator hopeful Joe Miller, minimum wage levels set by the U.S. Government are unconstitutional. The GOP nominee makes a good case to back his point, and may soon be able to make his argument on a national level if he wins the Alaska seat. Get the full story, with pictures and video below!

WELLINGTON, CO - SEPTEMBER 03: Migrant farm workers from Mexico inspect organic kale while working at the Grant Family Farms on September 3, 2010 in Wellington, Colorado. The farm, the largest organic vegetable farm outside of California, hires some 250 immigrant workers during the peak harvest season. Owner Andy Grant lamented that the issue of illegal immigration has become politicized nationally. 'They feed America,' he said. 'They should not be victimized.' Grant said his workers start at $7.25, which is the minimum wage in Colorado. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)






Pictured above, these migrant workers may be the first affected if there is a change to the nationional law. The Alaskan Tea Party upstart made a splash when he upset the Republican primary for the nomination, and scored another victory for ultra-conservative candidates.

“The state of Alaska has a minimum wage which is higher than the federal level because our state leaders have made that determination,” he said. “The minimum level again should be the state’s decision.”

According to Joe Miller, minimum wage should be set individually by states according to the Constitution. The issue has been largely overlooked by politicians of the past. Set by the U.S. Government in 1938, the law was regarded as somewhat socialist, but necessary in order to phase out sweat-shop factories. Now, the Alaskan hopeful is hoping to repeal the law, and give the power back to states.

“What I’d recommend that you do is go to the Constitution and look at the enumerated powers because what we have is something that we call the 10th Amendment that says, look if it’s not there if it’s not enumerated, then it’s delegated to the states,” he said. “Everything that’s not there is reserved to the states and the people.”

While it’s unlikely a first term Senator will be able to garner support for such a vast change to the law, the implications of repealing the law are still worth looking at. First, it’s worth noting that the majority of states already have their own laws on the matter. Only Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee do not. Repealing the law in these states could have some troubling side-effects. But most importantly, it would take a tool for controlling the national unemployment rate out of the hands of the U.S. government.

No doubt we’re a long way from having to face a de-nationalized law on this topic, but it’s certainly something to think about! What do you think of Joe Miller’s minimum wage argument? Should the law be left in the hands of the U.S. Government? Is it unconstitutional? Let me know your opinion in the comment section! For more on the story, check out the pictures and video below!

WELLINGTON, CO - SEPTEMBER 03: Migrant farm workers from Mexico harvest organic spinach while working at the Grant Family Farms on September 3, 2010 in Wellington, Colorado. The farm, the largest organic vegetable farm outside of California, hires some 250 immigrant workers during the peak harvest season. Owner Andy Grant lamented that the issue of illegal immigration has become politicized nationally. 'They feed America,' he said of immigrant workers. 'They should not be victimized.' Grant said his workers start at $7.25, which is the minimum wage in Colorado. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)WELLINGTON, CO - SEPTEMBER 03: Migrant farm workers from Mexico harvest organic zucchini while working at the Grant Family Farms on September 3, 2010 in Wellington, Colorado. The farm, the largest organic vegetable farm outside of California, hires some 250 immigrant workers during the peak harvest season. Owner Andy Grant lamented that the issue of illegal immigration has become politicized nationally. 'They feed America,' he said. 'They should not be victimized.' Grant said his workers start at $7.25, which is the minimum wage in Colorado. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)