Romanian fortune tellers and witches can breath a bit easier now. A plan by the Romanian lawmakers to tax witches was rejected. Senators decided against leveling a witch tax on fortune tellers and witches, perhaps in fear of curses and spells. The proposal would have forced such practitioners to keep more thorough records and receipts, and would hold them liable for any wrong predictions. The land that brought us Vlad Tepes birthplace, otherwise known as Count Dracula, is shrouded in mystery. No less so than the Wiccan religion here in the U.S. with it’s witch capital of Salem, Massachusetts.

HOOPESTON, IL - OCTOBER 25:  Wicca religion practitioners Rev. Don Lewis (L), Rev. Krystal High-Correll (C), and Rev. Virgina Powell HPS, participate in a Wiccan Lunar ritual in the temple at the Witch School October 25, 2006 in Hoopeston, Illinois. Wicca is a neo-Pagan religion which uses magic and nature in its teachings. The school, which opened in 2003, offers courses in Wicca theology, hosts seminars and Wiccan rituals at the campus.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Maria Campina, a well-known witch in Romania, said the legislation would have been difficult to execute because of the erratic nature of the business. But some suspect lawmakers were afraid of curses being placed upon them by the witches and Gypsy fortune tellers.

Romania has been suffering from the economic downturn as the rest of Europe has. The economy has shrunk some 7.1% since 2009. Sales taxes have been increased from 19% to 24% and public sector spending and wages have been slashed by 25%. In 2009, Romania borrowed $26 Billion dollars from the International Monetary Fund to cover bond obligations.

Perhaps the Romanian witches and fortune tellers should give free reading to the Romanian lawmakers, especially in regards to recent statements by European Central Bank president Jean-Claude Tritchet. He is proposing that those EU nations unable to meet their economic requirements be stripped of any voting privileges in the EU Parliament. Such a drastic move may spell the end of the Euro and the European Union.

Did the Romanian senators reject the witch tax because of fears of curses and spells? Or is it simply that Romanian fortune tellers and witches do not make enough money to really bother with? The land that brought us Vlad Tepes birthplace, otherwise known as Count Dracula, is shrouded in mystery. No less so than the Wiccan religion here in the U.S. with it’s witch capital of Salem, Massachusetts.

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