Did ancient Egyptians visit North America, leaving a vast treasure behind? Last night′s episode of America Unearthed, entitled Grand Canyon Treasure, on the History Channel H2 tries to answer the question. Forensic geologist Scott Wolter is on the trail of a possible treasure brought to America by the ancient Egyptians. If the legend is true, as many as 50,000 Egyptians fled to the New World in 25 B.C., led by Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Anthony and Cleopatra. Not only may they have hidden a treasure in the Grand Canyon, allegedly discovered by explorer G.E. Kincaid in 1909, but perhaps also in an area in southern Illinois, known oddly enough as Little Egypt. A cave allegedly discovered by Russel Burrows was said to be loaded with some 7,000 artifacts, including a solid, gold tomb for an Egyptian king. Are the legends, which many Indian tribes tell, true? Is our government hiding their own treasure in the Grand Canyon?

america unearthed grand canyon treasure

Is there hidden treasure in the Grand Canyon? Or is the canyon itself the treasure of beauty?

Scott Wolter meets with Jerry Wills, a local explorer, on the southern rim of the Grand Canyon. Wills tells Wolter about his own attempt to find the Kincaid cave in 2002. The Grand Canyon was carved over millions of years by the Colorado River. It is some 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and some 6,000 feet deep. The terrain is so vast and rugged that any expedition would be difficult, if not impossible. Wills only got some 800 feet down into an area known as Marble Canyon, the site reported in a 1909 edition of the Phoenix Gazette newspaper on the Kincaid discovery. In the 1920s, the Smithsonian Institute launched its own expedition, but claims it found nothing. Wills shows Wolter video and photos of his attempt to climb down into the canyon, until they were buzzed by an unmarked aircraft.

The two meet with a local Zuni tribal elder, Clifford Mahooty, who retells Indian legends about his people having met with strangers from a distant, eastern land. Mahooty believes that there are treasure sites. Scott and Jerry rent a tourist helicopter to fly them about the canyon, looking for signs of a cave. But they find nothing and are not allowed by the FAA to fly below the top rim of the canyon. With nothing to show, Scott moves on to his next location, Marion County, Illinois.

According to the accounts, Russel Burrows came across a cave in 1982, which had 13 crypts holding some 7,000 artifacts, including a solid gold sarcophagus. Scott met with Burrows in 2010 and interviewed him, seeing many of the artifacts. But after Wolter determined that one marble ′headstone′ piece, known as the Isis Stone, was undoubtedly a fake, Russel refuses to see him again. Burrows also keeps the location of the cave a secret. So Scott meets a local enthusiast, Harry Hubbard. Wolter shows him the marble fake, but also two other artifacts which could be genuine. Hubbard shows Scott a piece he believes is authentic that bears the name of Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Antony and Queen Cleopatra.

At the age of ten, in about 25 B.C., Helios disappears along with his followers and entourage. Translations of bout 500 pieces that Burrows claims to have discovered do bear the name of Helios and describes how Helios and some 50,000 Egyptians fled the Mediterranean from persecution. Did they wind up in North America, sailing into the Gulf of Mexico and them up the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers? Hubbard gives Scott a copy of a map which is allegedly made by Burrows showing the approximate location of the cave.

Wolter meets finally with the owner of the property where the cave allegedly is, Stephen Weilbacher. While Weilbacher refuses to allow others to explore his property, he does agree to give Scott acess to it and leads him to where the alleged Burrows map indicates. There, they do find an unusual rock shelf at the bottom of a ravine. Wolter examines the geology and while they do not find any cave entrance, Scott does think it is possible that the cave entrance may be concealed by a rock fall or by trees. The rock itself is mostly sandstone, an easy material to cut and carve through. Weilbacher is skeptical of the whole legend, telling Scott that the region became known as Little Egypt back in the 1800s when first settled by whites. What he did not say was how the legend was born from pyramid-like mounds discovered, allegedly made by early Indian tribes about 1000 A.D.. Known as the Cahokia tribe, their culture and presence died out around the 15th and 16th Centuries, replaced or displaced by another tribe, the Illini. So far, some eight mounds have been discovered along with other structures built by the prehistoric tribe.

So, in the final analysis in last night′s episode of America Unearthed, no Grand Canyon treasure was found. Nor was the cave allegedly discovered by Russel Burrows in the Little Egypt region of southern Illinois found. While at least one artifact found by Burrows, the marble Isis Stone, was clearly a fake, many others of the 7,000 items have an uncertain origin. Could they be signs that Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Anthony and Queen Cleopatra, had made his way to the New World to escape from Roman tyranny? Who can say?Did ancient Egyptians visit North America, leaving a vast treasure behind? Last night′s episode of America Unearthed, entitled Grand Canyon Treasure, on the History Channel H2 tries to answer the question. Forensic geologist Scott Wolter is on the trail of a possible treasure brought to America by the ancient Egyptians. If the legend is true, as many as 50,000 Egyptians fled to the New World in 25 B.C., led by Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Anthony and Cleopatra. Not only may they have hidden a treasure in the Grand Canyon, allegedly discovered by explorer G.E. Kincaid in 1909, but perhaps also in an area in southern Illinois, known oddly enough as Little Egypt. A cave allegedly discovered by Russel Burrows was said to be loaded with some 7,000 artifacts, including a solid, gold tomb for an Egyptian king. Are the legends, which many Indian tribes tell, true? Is our government hiding their own treasure in the Grand Canyon?

Scott Wolter meets with Jerry Wills, a local explorer, on the southern rim of the Grand Canyon. Wills tells Wolter about his own attempt to find the Kincaid cave in 2002. The Grand Canyon was carved over millions of years by the Colorado River. It is some 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and some 6,000 feet deep. The terrain is so vast and rugged that any expedition would be difficult, if not impossible. Wills only got some 800 feet down into an area known as Marble Canyon, the site reported in a 1909 edition of the Phoenix Gazette newspaper on the Kincaid discovery. In the 1920s, the Smithsonian Institute launched its own expedition, but claims it found nothing. Wills shows Wolter video and photos of his attempt to climb down into the canyon, until they were buzzed by an unmarked aircraft.

The two meet with a local Zuni tribal elder, Clifford Mahooty, who retells Indian legends about his people having met with strangers from a distant, eastern land. Mahooty believes that there are treasure sites. Scott and Jerry rent a tourist helicopter to fly them about the canyon, looking for signs of a cave. But they find nothing and are not allowed by the FAA to fly below the top rim of the canyon. With nothing to show, Scott moves on to his next location, Marion County, Illinois.

According to the accounts, Russel Burrows came across a cave in 1982, which had 13 crypts holding some 7,000 artifacts, including a solid gold sarcophagus. Scott met with Burrows in 2010 and interviewed him, seeing many of the artifacts. But after Wolter determined that one marble ′headstone′ piece, known as the Isis Stone, was undoubtedly a fake, Russel refuses to see him again. Burrows also keeps the location of the cave a secret. So Scott meets a local enthusiast, Harry Hubbard. Wolter shows him the marble fake, but also two other artifacts which could be genuine. Hubbard shows Scott a piece he believes is authentic that bears the name of Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Antony and Queen Cleopatra.

At the age of ten, in about 25 B.C., Helios disappears along with his followers and entourage. Translations of bout 500 pieces that Burrows claims to have discovered do bear the name of Helios and describes how Helios and some 50,000 Egyptians fled the Mediterranean from persecution. Did they wind up in North America, sailing into the Gulf of Mexico and them up the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers? Hubbard gives Scott a copy of a map which is allegedly made by Burrows showing the approximate location of the cave.

Wolter meets finally with the owner of the property where the cave allegedly is, Stephen Weilbacher. While Weilbacher refuses to allow others to explore his property, he does agree to give Scott acess to it and leads him to where the alleged Burrows map indicates. There, they do find an unusual rock shelf at the bottom of a ravine. Wolter examines the geology and while they do not find any cave entrance, Scott does think it is possible that the cave entrance may be concealed by a rock fall or by trees. The rock itself is mostly sandstone, an easy material to cut and carve through. Weilbacher is skeptical of the whole legend, telling Scott that the region became known as Little Egypt back in the 1800s when first settled by whites. What he did not say was how the legend was born from pyramid-like mounds discovered, allegedly made by early Indian tribes about 1000 A.D.. Known as the Cahokia tribe, their culture and presence died out around the 15th and 16th Centuries, replaced or displaced by another tribe, the Illini. So far, some eight mounds have been discovered along with other structures built by the prehistoric tribe.

So, in the final analysis in last night′s episode of America Unearthed, no Grand Canyon treasure was found. Nor was the cave allegedly discovered by Russel Burrows in the Little Egypt region of southern Illinois found. While at least one artifact found by Burrows, the marble Isis Stone, was clearly a fake, many others of the 7,000 items have an uncertain origin. Could they be signs that Alexander Helios, the son of Marc Anthony and Queen Cleopatra, had made his way to the New World to escape from Roman tyranny? Who can say?